Category: 2016

Deep Time Live #1

My Country Tis of Thy People, You’re Dying

March 31st – May 26th

Opening Reception:  March 31st 6 pm

 

Nicholas Galanin (Tlingit)


Cannupa Hanska Luger (Lakota/Mandan/Arikara/Hidatsa)


Steven J. Yazzie (Navajo)


Tom Jones (Ho Chunk)


Winter Count Collective (Merritt Johnson, Cannupa Hanska Luger,
Nicholas Galanin, Dylan McLaughlin ,Ginger Dunnill) 
 


Curated by Erin Joyce Projects

 

Indigenous peoples of the Western Hemisphere have a spiritual and mystical connection with the land. The land is part of the Indigenous tradition and religion, from creation stories to the way in which Indigenous peoples live their lives, the land is indivisible from Native America. Throughout the history of the United States and their relationality to Native tribes, the issue of land rights and ownership has been at the forefront of confrontation. From historic events like forced relocation from traditional lands, to contemporary issues of unauthorized sale of tribal land, energy extraction, and contested landscapes,My Country Tis of Thy People You’re Dying, is in reference to the song of the same title by Buffy Saint Marie, and will feature artworks by contemporary Indigenous North American artists examining the environmental impact of energy extraction, the impact it has on the collective Indigenous psyche, and the political framework that has and continues to enable unsanctioned land deals and the abuse of powers over the people. With issues in recent years such as the sale of Oak Flat on the San Carlos Apache Reservation in Southeastern Arizona, First Nations tribes fighting pipelines through their territory, and most prominently the conflict at Standing Rock in North Dakota, the timing of this exhibition could not be more relevant.

 

The mediums represented in this exhibition will be mixed. A film installation by Steven J. Yazzie (Navajo) looks at the impact of uranium mining on the Navajo reservation, on the Navajo people, their health, and the health of the land through stunning and poignant narrative and visual imagery. Nicholas Galanin’s (Tlingit) God Complex, inspects the dynamics of power structures, the glorification of violence, and police brutality; redressing pop culture iconography with a religiosity, echoing Western society’s worship of material over life. Tom Jones (Ho Chunk) work, The North American Landscape, is a series of photographs of plastic toy trees. The work utilizes the trees as stand-ins for the landscape of North America and represents the areas American Indians continue to inhabit on this continent. It also comments on the destruction of the natural world replacing nature with manmade replicas. Other artists in the exhibition include ceramic sculpture by Cannupa Hanska Luger (Lakota/Mandan/Arikara/Hidatsa), and a video installation by Winter Count, a collective of Indigenous artists including Merritt Johnson , Cannupa Hanska Luger, Nicholas Galanin, Ginger Dunnill and Dylan McLaughlin .

 

The exhibition opens at Radiator Gallery in Long Island City, New York March 31st, 2017, and runs through May 26, 2017.

 

The exhibition is generously supported by a Social Justice Grant from the Shelley and Donald Rubin Foundation and fiscal sponsorship from New York Foundation

 

PRESS RELEASE                 PRESS KIT                  CHECKLIST            BOOKLET

 

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POstcard

 

Embody

Special Event by Shani Ha and Amélie Gaulier-Brody

Sunday, December 11th, 5 pm at Radiator Gallery
Duration of Performance: approx. 20 mins.

The “Embody” series play with abstraction and metamorphose to incarnate complex shifting identities and interactions. Performed since 2011, the Embody blurs the boundaries between sculpture, bodies, and representation. For this iteration, Shani Ha invited performance artist Amélie Gaulier-Brody to invest and interpret Embody.

This series of sculpture is the catalysis for photographs, installations, and performances. Shani Ha invites the audience, performers and dancers to interact with the piece and invest them in different situations.

The soft sculptures are constantly shifting and adapting to the context and silhouettes, creating successive ephemeral sculptural forms. Embody exists in different temporality and formats, the sculptures can be contemplated steady, in action or be activated.

About the exhibition Neither Here Nor There
Nov 18th, 2016 – Jan 20th, 2017

Featuring works by:
Anne Mourier, Fanny Allié, Jeanne Verdoux, Julien Gardair
Marilia Destot, Nicolas Touron, Shani Ha, Simon Courchel

Curated by: Nicolas Touron / Fanny Allié

The exhibition Neither Here Nor There presents the works of eight artists who all share the same birthplace – France and who voluntarily migrated several years ago to New York City.

Not quite from one side or the other anymore, a nonnative constantly oscillates between two realities, fully belonging to none. Through mixed media, sculpture, photography and painting, the artists of Neither Here Nor There examine this state of being slightly “out of tune” and how their experience may have impacted their work over the years. The exhibit also aims to highlight a common thread between all the works – a feeling of detachment of the human figure from its urban environment, within a context of personal narration and a touch of absurdity. The sense of isolation and fragmentation that can emanate from the works is nonetheless often counterbalanced with whimsicality and humor.

In her series Gowanus Dance, Marilia Destot isolates and places her model in a cinematic or sequence form, her photographic work focusing on the intimate writing of time and space intermingled. Exploring the same medium, Simon Courchel creates in each of his photographs an urban choreography or performance thus referencing his background as a dancer; the figure being always insulated and centered within the frame. In Anne Mourier’s small sculptures depicting domestic scenes, the figure is removed all together but constantly in mind, like a ghostly presence, only the habitat remains. Nicolas Touron’s ceramic and video installation Artificial Landscape is a visual fable, existing as a landscape of absurdity in which a dead cicada found at the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens during his numerous explorations there, plays the main character.

Jeanne Verdoux’s prints show the human figure deprived from any context but in constant motion, sometimes in the verge of falling, where ground and air merge into one dimension. Fanny Allié’s characters, often placed on a white background are also removed from their habitat or environment; their urban feel come through nonetheless. In his Artforum mashup series, Julien Gardair combines and cuts Artforum advertisement pages, revealing from these art magazines human silhouettes intermingling with animals, body and abstract elements and creating a chaotic mass. Lastly, in order to remedy the isolation she may find in fast-paced cities, Shani Ha creates versatile sculptures and devices in an effort to bring people together or to add a comforting touch to her surrounding.

 

Neither Here Nor There

The Gallery is closed for winter break and will reopen March 31st for the upcoming show My Country Tis of Thy People, You’re Dying.

Duration of the show: Nov 18, 2016 – Feb 3, 2017

Opening reception: Nov 18th, 2016

Featuring works by: Anne Mourier, Fanny Allié, Jeanne verdoux, Julien Gardair, Marilia Destot, Nicolas Touron, Shani Ha, Simon Courchel

Curated by: Nicolas Touron / Fanny Allié

The exhibition Neither Here Nor There presents the works of eight artists who all share the same birthplace – France and who voluntarily migrated several years ago to New York City.

Not quite from one side or the other anymore, a nonnative constantly oscillates between two realities, fully belonging to none. Through mixed media, sculpture, photography and painting, the artists of Neither Here Nor There examine this state of being slightly “out of tune” and how their experience may have impacted their work over the years.

The exhibit also aims to highlight a common thread between all the works – a feeling of detachment of the human figure from its urban environment, within a context of personal narration and a touch of absurdity. The sense of isolation and fragmentation that can emanate from the works is nonetheless often counterbalanced with whimsicality and humor.

In her series Gowanus Dance, Marilia Destot isolates and places her model in a cinematic or sequence form, her photographic work focusing on the intimate writing of time and space intercrossed. Exploring the same medium, Simon Courchel creates in each of his photographs an urban choreography or performance thus referencing his background as a dancer; the figure being always insulated and centered within the frame. In Anne Mourier’s small sculptures depicting domestic scenes, the figure is removed all together but constantly in mind, like a ghostly presence, only the habitat remains. Nicolas Touron’s ceramic and video installation Artificial Landscape is a visual fable, existing as a landscape of absurdity in which a dead cicada found at the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens during his numerous explorations there, plays the main character. Jeanne Verdoux’s prints show the human figure deprived from any context but in constant motion, sometimes in the verge of falling, where ground and air merge into one dimension. Fanny Allié’s characters, often placed on a white background are also removed from their habitat or environment; their urban feel come through nonetheless.

In his Artforum mashup series, Julien Gardair combines and cuts Artforum advertisement pages, revealing from these art magazines human silhouettes intermingling with animals, body and abstract elements and creating a chaotic mass.

Lastly, in order to remedy the isolation she may find in fast-paced cities, Shani Ha creates versatile sculptures and devices in an effort to bring people together or to add a comforting touch to her surrounding.

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BRUNCH:

The Descent of Dust

Special Event by Michael Clemow

Sound Installation using found noise, Yamaha keyboard, and speakers

October 28, 2016 6:30—8:30PM

The Descent of Dust takes its sonic palette from the sounds of a circuit bent and “broken” Yamaha VSS-30 digital synthesizer from 1987. The instrument and a library of sounds recorded from the device are used to create a dirty, textural soundscape in four channels. Driving the composition is a genetic algorithm that creates “cultures” of sonic entities that are born and ultimately eradicated multiple times during the course of the performance.

The VSS-30 is a sampling keyboard, allowing a re-sampling of the generated material. This creates a feedback loop that perpetuates sonic characteristics of one “generation” to the next. The performer can choose to restart the culture during the performance, however, the unstable algorithm will eventually destroy itself, ending the performance.

In line with Radiator Gallery’s group exhibition Works: Reflections on Failure, Michael Clemow’s immersive sound installation The Descent of Dust delves into the essence of failure, questioning the unpredictability of the machine facing mankind’s scrutinizing nature.

Throughout his multi-media sound installation, Clemow will challenge auto-recordings, tracing their ephemeral beings and susceptibility for destruction. Works: Reflections on Failure, curated by Osman Can Yerebakan, features works by Daniel A. Bruce, Esmeralda Kosmatopoulos, Ahmet Civelek, Jennifer Grimyser, Tim Etchells, Dana Stirling, Juliette Dumas, Shannon Finnegan, Kay Rosen, Christina Massey, and George Spencer.

 

Works: Reflections on Failure

September 16-November 12, 2016

Opening reception on September 16th, 2016 between 6:00-9:00PM.

Curated by Osman Can Yerebakan

 

Radiator Gallery is pleased to present Works: Reflections on Failure, a group exhibition

featuring works by Daniel A. Bruce, Esmeralda Kosmatopoulos, Ahmet Civelek, Jennifer

Grimyser, Tim Etchells, Dana Stirling, Juliette Dumas, Shannon Finnegan, Kay Rosen, Christina

Massey and George Spencer. Curated by Osman Can Yerebakan, the exhibition brings together

eleven contemporary artists working in a wide variety of mediums, investigating the notion of

failure in contemporary art.

 

Offering a platform to survey the relationship between the artist, the artwork and the audience;

failure suggests a study on the artistic drive, contextual meaning, and viewer expectation. Inspired

by the late artist and author Édouard Levé’s book Works, in which he gathered more than five-

hundred artistic ideas he aimed to bring into fruition, the exhibition scrutinizes the ambiguous

border separating success from downfall. Levé’s candid devotion for creativity—leading to such

accumulation of ideas that eventually failed to be executed—projects an inquisitive mind’s strive

for achievement, as well as his bold undertaking of potential failures. The exhibition not only

studies the assumption of defeat as creative means, but also juxtaposes its various depictions in

contemporary art. Approaching the topic from various angles, artworks on view respond to

unsuccessfulness through different channels, among which are viewer expectation, emotional

investment, and risk-taking.

 

The exhibition will remain on view through November 12, 2016. Radiator Gallery is located on

10-61 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City, NY 11106. The gallery hours are Friday and Sunday 1-

6 PM or anytime by appointment.

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On The Gnostic Trail into South India

Special Event at Radiator Gallery

Lecture by Peter Solymosi
Friday, July 8th, 2016, 6.30 pm at Radiator Gallery

The Gnostic Trail into South India” is a discourse held by Peter Solymosi at the Radiator Gallery.  Solymosi is currently co-exhibiting paintings he made in the Indian and Nepali Himalayas, and now at this occasion he is giving us a philological attempt to reveal one direction in the mind-science of Gnosis by showing a school whose teaching emphasized the creative power of man.

Through the distorted optics of later traditions the Gnostics are seen in the back-mirror as a “sect” in the time of Jesus, condemned as heresy, though their remaining literature reveal the very quintessential of the Classic Worlds. Within it the interpretations and comments of Jesus unite the insights of mainstream Greek with Jewish mystics and Eastern knowledge in a faultlessly seamed coherent world-view.

In the second part of the lecture we will follow the authentic story and path of Judas Thomas, the disciple of Jesus who visited and stayed in India in AD 52-72. Peter Solymosi also documented the eight locations where his spiritual movement had temples built, one of them in fact is still intact. A movement which was neither Christian nor Jewish but with guru Jesus was adopted by the Indian environment.

The length of the discourse with slide-show is ca. 45 minutes.

About the exhibition:

Remote: Studio Not Required featuring artists Peter Solymosi and Georgi Tushev, reflects the innate human desire to conquer magnificent vistas and landscapes and to engage the viewer in a contemporary interpretation of nature’s ongoing transformation through paintings, video captured by home-made drones, and orthographic maps. Both Solymosi and Tushev show great dedication and effort to achieve “altitudes” beyond in their art practice. Their notion of research and careful approximation to the “site” acts as an open-air laboratory.

People densely inhabit the planet and it’s surpassing 7 billion right now. Our lives are fast paced, busy, dense, a far cry from the tranquil days of our ancestors.  Our human actions transform the landscape in notable, sometimes irreparable ways.  Yet we still have hope for solitude and perspective so we travel to the farthest reaches of the world. We seek out the remotest place we can reach to sense it, be it, and have its imprint in our mind. We relish the vistas and space; the vastness in which our spirits can roam.

The artists in this show not only capture nature as they experience it – majestic, mutable, altered – but investigate and immerse in its whole as it reflects back to their urban innate self. Their constant relationship to nature’s changing and often-disappearing character forces them to return to record and to document it  – in paint and in pixels.

Peter Solymosi returns home to Radiator Gallery from trekking the beyond with a series of paintings created in the Indian and Nepali Himalayas, portraying mountain ranges and peaks: the local sky-scrapers. From a topographical point of view we camp at sites at 14, 000 Ft surrounded by breathtaking geo-seismic rifts in the visual landscape. Majestic peak formations with their impeccable anatomy appear to transcend into amorphous personages. These masterfully planned and executed paintings are rare examples of the genre of plain-air. Scope the realism catching a spaceless space as if flying on a magic carpet. “On the higher altitudes one is never alone though, the others are just farther away … ”

Georgi Tushev’s tool of choice is a homemade remote control airplane outfitted with a camera and beaming live video down to video goggles he wears to navigate the craft. This First-Person View experience enables him to project his mind into the craft and reach higher and farther than by any other means. The camera captures glorious footage of mountains, lakes, volcanoes, rainforests; some of these landscape features won’t be the same within our lifetime. Photographs are processed to produce maps of territories in Panama and Peru, for example, documenting changes caused by incursions on the landscape – oil spills and deforestation, ranching, and other marks of human presence.

Tushev explores both remote-control craft’s capacity to create new aesthetic, perceptual experiences and to document inaccessible landscapes and protected environments. Under the Tushevs Aerials label, he develops unmanned aerial vehicles’ application and creates his own technical innovations as a continuum of his artistic and professional practices, helping advance their potential as an alternative to commercial or governmental interests, building content through artistic and sociopolitical engagement.

Remote: Studio not Required

June 24th – July 24th, 2016

Opening: Friday, June 24, 2016, 6–9 pm

 

Artists: Peter Solymosi, Georgi Tushev

Curated by Nina Kantcheva Tushev

 

’Remote: Studio Not Required‘ featuring artists Peter Solymosi and Georgi Tushev, reflects the innate human desire to conquer magnificent vistas and landscapes and to engage the viewer in a contemporary interpretation of nature’s ongoing transformation through paintings, video captured by home-made drones, and orthographic maps. Both Solymosi and Tushev show great dedication and effort to achieve “altitudes” beyond in their art practice. Their notion of research and careful approximation to the “site” acts as an open-air laboratory.

People densely inhabit the planet and it’s surpassing 7 billion right now. Our lives are fast paced, busy, dense, a far cry from the tranquil days of our ancestors.  Our human actions transform the landscape in notable, sometimes irreparable ways.  Yet we still have hope for solitude and perspective so we travel to the farthest reaches of the world. We seek out the remotest place we can reach to sense it, be it, and have its imprint in our mind. We relish the vistas and space; the vastness in which our spirits can roam.

The artists in this show not only capture nature as they experience it – majestic, mutable, altered – but investigate and immerse in its whole as it reflects back to their urban innate self. Their constant relationship to nature’s changing and often-disappearing character forces them to return to record and to document it  – in paint and in pixels.

Peter Solymosi returns home to Radiator Gallery from trekking the beyond with a series of paintings created in the Indian and Nepali Himalayas, portraying mountain ranges and peaks: the local sky-scrapers. From a topographical point of view we camp at sites at 14, 000 Ft surrounded by breathtaking geo-seismic rifts in the visual landscape. Majestic peak formations with their impeccable anatomy appear to transcend into amorphous personages. These masterfully planned and executed paintings are rare examples of the genre of plain-air. Scope the realism catching a spaceless space as if flying on a magic carpet. “On the higher altitudes one is never alone though, the others are just farther away … ”

 

Georgi Tushev’s tool of choice is a homemade remote control airplane outfitted with a camera and beaming live video down to video goggles he wears to navigate the craft. This First-Person View experience enables him to project his mind into the craft and reach higher and farther than by any other means. The camera captures glorious footage of mountains, lakes, volcanoes, rainforests; some of these landscape features won’t be the same within our lifetime. Photographs are processed to produce maps of territories in Panama and Peru, for example, documenting changes caused by incursions on the landscape – oil spills and deforestation, ranching, and other marks of human presence.

 

Tushev explores both remote-control craft’s capacity to create new aesthetic, perceptual experiences and to document inaccessible landscapes and protected environments. Under the Tushevs Aerials label, he develops unmanned aerial vehicles’ application and creates his own technical innovations as a continuum of his artistic and professional practices, helping advance their potential as an alternative to commercial or governmental interests, building content through artistic and sociopolitical engagement.

Peter Solymosi will hold a discourse about the Gnostic connection on the Indian subcontinent, a discussion presentation of a travel diary following the trail of Jesus’ disciple Thomas in Kerala AD 52-72. The apocryphal story of the Gnostic gospels …. which also Nietzsche would have loved to hear!

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Enid Ellen performing at Radiator Gallery

Are we gonna let de-elevator

Enid Ellen performing at Radiator Gallery

Friday May 27th, 2016
7.30 pm at Radiator Gallery

Visual artist David Mramor has an extensive performance practice under the guise of Enid Ellen, a post-gender feminist singer-songwriter. Using his poetry he collaborates with Greg Potter on the piano to create melodic songs. The live performances are infused with his training in Kundalini yoga, visual art and theater. He has performed in NYC at Joe’s Pub, the Kitchen, PS 122, The Whitney Museum of American Art, and Dixon Place. The duo released a debut album entitled Cannibal Disease with a music video for “White Snake” in 2010. They are currently recording a new album, which will be released later this year.

About Surface To Air
April 29th – June 17th, 2016

Radiator Arts is pleased to present Surface To Air, a three-person show featuring Scott Alario,
Michael Childress and Benjamin Phelan, curated by R.J. Supa.

Surface to Air explores the relationship between physical surfaces (tactile, tangible, real) and the otherworldly (imaginary, celestial, unknown). Physical surfaces are made by hand or machine and oftentimes both. All three artists help to confuse the process.

Alario’s photographs document his family life, exposing intimate moments that draw the viewer in but also shock in their candor – is nothing sacred? There’s a familiarity and tenderness in the objects photographed: candy, pee-stained bed sheets, sticks and stones – a glimpse into childhood fantasy and reality that take on a 1950’s version of the future, a nuclear family in a post-nuclear age. Through analog special effects each images is manipulated for its final presentation.

Childress’ paintings are, at first glance, beautiful yet simple gradients, examining a formal relationship between color and composition. Through a unique staining process each work delivers a blurred horizon, creating an image of the far reaches of our individual experience of a three-dimensional world. The final result recalls a chemical haze or an altered reality. Something appears beneath the surface, an impending doom or beauty as a result of a man-made disaster. The paintings can be seen as purely abstract works, buoyant color fields on a flat surface or they can be viewed as representational, allowing the viewer to experience a depth and distance not unlike a vista in the physical realm.

Phelan’s sculptures appear to have a hand in them, or at least a swipe on a screen. Fingertip pressure converting into streaming digital spheres, recorded by CNC milling into polyethylene foam, the mark making is within the ubiquitous preservation material. Stored, but the spectrum is still oscillating; what appears solid is mostly just air, and the speculative topology of machine vision has eyes for the stone forms of antiquity – radiocarbon dating. Oftentimes the larger sculptural work is reminiscent of anatomy, unfurled organs, the brain stretched from end to end. The sculptures serve as pieces of a greater whole – disused components in a body or a building. Things left behind, a piece of a wall, a neuron synapse, the flicker of light emitting diodes. Together all three create fantasy – an alternative landscape, pitch black, rife with color, stark white illuminated by a rainbow of light – that explores a natural world of either a not-too-distant future or a present happening some light years away.

 

Surface to Air

Opening: Friday, April 29th 20166 – 9 pm

It’s amazing how I get so high and stay so down to Earth.Curren$y with Wiz Khalifa, “Surface to Air”

 

Radiator Arts is pleased to present Surface to Air, a three-person show featuring Scott Alario, Michael Childress and Benjamin Phelan, curated by R.J. Supa.

Surface to Air explores the relationship between physical surfaces (tactile, tangible, real) and the otherworldly (imaginary, celestial, unknown). Physical surfaces are made by hand or machine and oftentimes both. All three artists help to confuse the process.

Alario’s photographs document his family life, exposing intimate moments that draw the viewer in but also shock in their candor – is nothing sacred? There’s a familiarity and tenderness in the objects photographed: candy, pee-stained bed sheets, sticks and stones – a glimpse into childhood fantasy and reality that take on a 1950’s version of the future, a nuclear family in a post-nuclear age. Through analog special effects each images is manipulated for its final presentation.

Childress’ paintings are, at first glance, beautiful yet simple gradients, examining a formal relationship between color and composition.  Through a unique staining process each work delivers a blurred horizon, creating an image of the far reaches of our individual experience of a three-dimensional world. The final result recalls a chemical haze or an altered reality. Something appears beneath the surface, an impending doom or beauty as a result of a man-made disaster.  The paintings can be seen as purely abstract works, buoyant color fields on a flat surface or they can be viewed as representational, allowing the viewer to experience a depth and distance not unlike a vista in the physical realm.

Phelan’s sculptures appear to have a hand in them, or at least a swipe on a screen. Fingertip pressure converting into streaming digital spheres, recorded by CNC milling into polyethylene foam, the mark making is within the ubiquitous preservation material. Stored, but the spectrum is still oscillating; what appears solid is mostly just air, and the speculative topology of machine vision has eyes for the stone forms of antiquity – radiocarbon dating. Oftentimes the larger sculptural work is reminiscent of anatomy, unfurled organs, the brain stretched from end to end. The sculptures serve as pieces of a greater whole – disused components in a body or a building. Things left behind, a piece of a wall, a neuron synapse, the flicker of light emitting diodes.

Together all three create fantasy – an alternative landscape, pitch black, rife with color, stark white illuminated by a rainbow of light – that explores a natural world of either a not-too-distant future or a present happening some light years away.

 

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