Author: radiator

Space Odyssey beyond Material Confinements

Opening Reception: Sep 15th
Exhibition Dates: Sep 15th – Oct 27th, 2017 
Curated by Nadja Verena Marcin

“I’m sorry, Frank, but I don’t think I can answer that question without knowing everything that all of you know.” (HAL 9000)

Suggesting that the age of globalization has brought new invisible walls, harmful to society, the exhibition stages manifestations that perforate existing and search for invisible walls. The exhibition is based on the idea that the four artists form a Monolithic mastermind who stirs and produces consequences via a think tank of Keren Benbenisty, Juliana Cerqueira Leite, Shanjana Mahmud, Nadja Verena Marcin and Ann Oren. Space Odyssey will turn the Radiator Gallery inside out, looking from the center towards the walls and symbolically beyond the material confinements into the world.

Whereas the Monolith in the movie represents and triggers epic transitions in the history of human evolution from ape-like beings to civilized people, in Space Odyssey beyond Material Confinements the artists take responsibility for ‘advancing intelligent life’ and creating ‘something that has no shape’ but meaning. (Wikipedia: Interpretations of 2001: A Space Odyssey). Playing the alien, the other coming to earth, and experiencing the dawn of mankind as thought experience in the 21st century.

Themes of the show will entail artificial intelligence, explosion of movement, HAL goes Athena, reversed gravity, feminine architecture, fingerprints on displays to be explored by Keren Benbenisty, Juliana Cerqueira Leite, Shanjana Mahmud, Nadja Verena Marcin and Ann Oren.

Deep Time Live #2

music and video performances

July 13th, 7pm at Radiator Gallery

Featuring artists Lucy Lewis, Jay Hines, Little Aga and King Pong
Curated by T. Cross

Lucy Lewis is an artist and musician, based in NY. Her practice is largely an experimentation with analog hardware devices and modular synthesis. She has performed at MATA Festival, MoMA PS1, The Kitchen, Non-Event, Goethe Institute Boston, among others.

Jay Hines is an artist and musician, sometimes performing music under the name Balloon Monument. He’s exhibited in various galleries and museums.Both Lewis and Hines work collaboratively on publishing commissioned sound-related works by contemporary artists, under their own editions umbrella Shift Registry. This marks the first musical collaboration, between the two.

Little Aga is a music duo consisting of multi disciplines artists, Jon Nicholson and Erica Kenia. Both are members of long running avant electronic rock outfit, Excepter. Little Aga is a waking dream, translated into our version of what popular music should be. 

King Pong is an international, hyper sensory digital landscape birthed by the artist and man, Siebren Versteeg. Analog alliteration approved. 

Ear Plugs are not required, however, strongly suggested.

About Deep Time
June 2nd – July 14th 2017

Radiator Gallery is pleased to present artists:

Mike Andrews, Robin Kang, LoVid, Jodie Mack, Leeza Meksin and Mitch Patrick
Curated by Tali Hinkis.

Throughout the course of history, humans have gradually perfected their actions. Like Pleistocene glaciers gliding down the face of North America, our hands, fingers, and brains have been epochally evolving, our nimble fortitude advancing towards an intricate comprehension of complex systems. The human mind and its dexterity provided the skillset for creation to become a meditative act – one with spiritual and philosophical inclinations. Our simple utilitarian survival tactics made way towards a higher purpose – comfort, texture, design and craftsmanship ultimately became their own objectives.

Textiles and their ilk have long represented a bridge between the two principles of functionality and higher design. They provide coverage from the elements and allow us to flex our aesthetics; we may appreciate the plain rug beneath our feet, but our souls (soles?) revere a Persian motif. The historical context of fiber is a synopsis of human history, interwoven and mired in the politics, mores, and spirituality inherent in every civilization. Initially manifested by one of the oldest advanced cultures, Ancient Egypt, its production has seen us through the highs of human spirituality (the Kaaba’s Sitara in Mecca) and its abominable lows (the rampant colonialism and slavery tied to its manufacture). Nonetheless, its prolific necessity has spun into godly legend, its natural emblems tied to divine desideratum. The spider, an internationally and historically venerated symbol of weavers and cunning, can claim immortal lineage from Greek αράχνη and higher intellect from the African Anansi. According to the Hopi, the world would not even exist if it weren’t for Grandmother Spider weaving the thoughts from her head. Fabric and its design has become part of the human tapestry, its threads and folds changing course with time.

Here in the Anthropocene, we have developed new dimensions beyond the tangible realm. Cyberspace is its own universe of creation, a networked state of intuitive architecture where coded logic reigns supreme. One would fear a coldness in these ciphered margins, but artists have co-opted its language and rules for an anarchic mission: to define and reorder the human condition. By molding the fleshy, organic tactility of IRL to the digital cloud, creative inspiration has pulled textured corpulence into the mainframe. At first, we looked through the blue-lit prism to see our reflection on the screen. New media art was once synonymous with hacking into a new form of digital DNA and creating our own transcendence, but now, the pendulum swings back towards our original concept of craft. The patterns and glitches so diligently formulated through computations, mouse clicks, and Photoshop layers can be recycled through the speculum into 3D objects with stitches and shuttles – the new hyper-contemporary relics of an electronic age.

DEEP TIME provides a canny and sensitive lexicon of artists to this new symbiotic structure, as the heart and spirit of this exhibition can be found in the intersection of the media and material. The cerebral approach of Mitch Patrick, Jodie Mack, and LoVid in their analog work juxtaposes beautifully with the palpable emotional adroitness behind the craft of Robin Kang, Mike Andrews, and Leeza Meksin. DEEP TIME is an ambitious and canonical translation of our current relationship with art and technology, and serves to remind us of our own nebulous existence – for here we are, all of us: abundant matter and pixelated light.
Text by J. Simmz

J. Simmz is an independent curator, writer, and co-founder of Doppelgänger Projects, based in Ridgewood, Queens. 

Radiator Atelier

Atelier Radiator copy

Deep Time Live #1

Deep Time

DEEP TIME

 

June 2nd – July 14th, 2017

Opening Reception June 2nd, 6 pm Radiator Gallery

10-61 Jackson Ave LIC, New York

Radiator Gallery is pleased to present artists: Mike Andrews, Robin Kang, LoVid, Jodie Mack,

Leeza Meksin and Mitch Patrick

Curated by Tali Hinkis.

 

Throughout the course of history, humans have gradually perfected their actions. Like Pleistocene glaciers gliding down the face of North America, our hands, fingers, and brains have been epochally evolving, our nimble fortitude advancing towards an intricate comprehension of complex systems. The human mind and its dexterity provided the skill set for creation to become a meditative act – one with spiritual and philosophical inclinations. Our simple utilitarian survival tactics made way towards a higher purpose – comfort, texture, design and craftsmanship ultimately became their own objectives.

Textiles and their ilk have long represented a bridge between the two principles of functionality and higher design. They provide coverage from the elements and allow us to flex our aesthetics; we may appreciate the plain rug beneath our feet, but our souls (soles?) revere a Persian motif. The historical context of fiber is a synopsis of human history, interwoven and mired in the politics, mores, and spirituality inherent in every civilization. Initially manifested by one of the oldest advanced cultures, Ancient Egypt, its production has seen us through the highs of human spirituality (the Kaaba’s Sitara in Mecca) and its abominable lows (the rampant colonialism and slavery tied to its manufacture). Nonetheless, its prolific necessity has spun into godly legend, its natural emblems tied to divine desideratum. The spider, an internationally and historically venerated symbol of weavers and cunning, can claim immortal lineage from Greek αράχνη and higher intellect from the African Anansi. According to the Hopi, the world would not even exist if it weren’t for Grandmother Spider weaving the thoughts from her head. Fabric and its design have become part of the human tapestry, its threads and folds changing course with time.

Here in the Anthropocene, we have developed new dimensions beyond the tangible realm. Cyberspace is its own universe of creation, a networked state of intuitive architecture where coded logic reigns supreme. One would fear a coldness in these ciphered margins, but artists have co-opted its language and rules for an anarchic mission: to define and reorder the human condition. By molding the fleshy, organic tactility of IRL to the digital cloud, creative inspiration has pulled textured corpulence into the mainframe. At first, we looked through the blue-lit prism to see our reflection on the screen. New media art was once synonymous with hacking into a new form of digital DNA and creating our own transcendence, but now, the pendulum swings back towards our original concept of craft. The patterns and glitches so diligently formulated through computations, mouse clicks, and Photoshop layers can be recycled through the speculum into 3D objects with stitches and shuttles – the new hyper-contemporary relics of an electronic age.

DEEP TIME provides a canny and sensitive lexicon of artists to this new symbiotic structure, as the heart and spirit of this exhibition can be found in the intersection of the media and material. The cerebral approach of Mitch Patrick, Jodie Mack, and LoVid in their analog work juxtaposes beautifully with the palpable emotional adroitness behind the craft of Robin Kang, Mike Andrews, and Leeza Meksin. DEEP TIME is an ambitious and canonical translation of our current relationship with art and technology, and serves to remind us of our own nebulous existence – for here we are, all of us: abundant matter and pixelated light.

Text by J. Simmz

J. Simmz is an independent curator, writer, and co-founder of Doppelgänger Projects, based in Ridgewood, Queens.

The exhibition opens at Radiator Gallery in Long Island City, New York June 2nd, 2017, and runs through July 14th, 2017.

 

PRESS RELEASE                   PRESS BOOK                      CHECKLIST

 

ARTWORK:

 

OPENING RECEPTION:

My Country Tis of Thy People, You’re Dying

March 31st – May 26th

Opening Reception:  March 31st 6 pm

 

Nicholas Galanin (Tlingit)


Cannupa Hanska Luger (Lakota/Mandan/Arikara/Hidatsa)


Steven J. Yazzie (Navajo)


Tom Jones (Ho Chunk)


Winter Count Collective (Merritt Johnson, Cannupa Hanska Luger,
Nicholas Galanin, Dylan McLaughlin ,Ginger Dunnill) 
 


Curated by Erin Joyce Projects

 

Indigenous peoples of the Western Hemisphere have a spiritual and mystical connection with the land. The land is part of the Indigenous tradition and religion, from creation stories to the way in which Indigenous peoples live their lives, the land is indivisible from Native America. Throughout the history of the United States and their relationality to Native tribes, the issue of land rights and ownership has been at the forefront of confrontation. From historic events like forced relocation from traditional lands, to contemporary issues of unauthorized sale of tribal land, energy extraction, and contested landscapes,My Country Tis of Thy People You’re Dying, is in reference to the song of the same title by Buffy Saint Marie, and will feature artworks by contemporary Indigenous North American artists examining the environmental impact of energy extraction, the impact it has on the collective Indigenous psyche, and the political framework that has and continues to enable unsanctioned land deals and the abuse of powers over the people. With issues in recent years such as the sale of Oak Flat on the San Carlos Apache Reservation in Southeastern Arizona, First Nations tribes fighting pipelines through their territory, and most prominently the conflict at Standing Rock in North Dakota, the timing of this exhibition could not be more relevant.

 

The mediums represented in this exhibition will be mixed. A film installation by Steven J. Yazzie (Navajo) looks at the impact of uranium mining on the Navajo reservation, on the Navajo people, their health, and the health of the land through stunning and poignant narrative and visual imagery. Nicholas Galanin’s (Tlingit) God Complex, inspects the dynamics of power structures, the glorification of violence, and police brutality; redressing pop culture iconography with a religiosity, echoing Western society’s worship of material over life. Tom Jones (Ho Chunk) work, The North American Landscape, is a series of photographs of plastic toy trees. The work utilizes the trees as stand-ins for the landscape of North America and represents the areas American Indians continue to inhabit on this continent. It also comments on the destruction of the natural world replacing nature with manmade replicas. Other artists in the exhibition include ceramic sculpture by Cannupa Hanska Luger (Lakota/Mandan/Arikara/Hidatsa), and a video installation by Winter Count, a collective of Indigenous artists including Merritt Johnson , Cannupa Hanska Luger, Nicholas Galanin, Ginger Dunnill and Dylan McLaughlin .

 

The exhibition opens at Radiator Gallery in Long Island City, New York March 31st, 2017, and runs through May 26, 2017.

 

The exhibition is generously supported by a Social Justice Grant from the Shelley and Donald Rubin Foundation and fiscal sponsorship from New York Foundation

 

PRESS RELEASE                 PRESS KIT                  CHECKLIST            BOOKLET

 

ARTWORK:

 

OPENING RECEPTION:

 

POstcard

 

Embody

Special Event by Shani Ha and Amélie Gaulier-Brody

Sunday, December 11th, 5 pm at Radiator Gallery
Duration of Performance: approx. 20 mins.

The “Embody” series play with abstraction and metamorphose to incarnate complex shifting identities and interactions. Performed since 2011, the Embody blurs the boundaries between sculpture, bodies, and representation. For this iteration, Shani Ha invited performance artist Amélie Gaulier-Brody to invest and interpret Embody.

This series of sculpture is the catalysis for photographs, installations, and performances. Shani Ha invites the audience, performers and dancers to interact with the piece and invest them in different situations.

The soft sculptures are constantly shifting and adapting to the context and silhouettes, creating successive ephemeral sculptural forms. Embody exists in different temporality and formats, the sculptures can be contemplated steady, in action or be activated.

About the exhibition Neither Here Nor There
Nov 18th, 2016 – Jan 20th, 2017

Featuring works by:
Anne Mourier, Fanny Allié, Jeanne Verdoux, Julien Gardair
Marilia Destot, Nicolas Touron, Shani Ha, Simon Courchel

Curated by: Nicolas Touron / Fanny Allié

The exhibition Neither Here Nor There presents the works of eight artists who all share the same birthplace – France and who voluntarily migrated several years ago to New York City.

Not quite from one side or the other anymore, a nonnative constantly oscillates between two realities, fully belonging to none. Through mixed media, sculpture, photography and painting, the artists of Neither Here Nor There examine this state of being slightly “out of tune” and how their experience may have impacted their work over the years. The exhibit also aims to highlight a common thread between all the works – a feeling of detachment of the human figure from its urban environment, within a context of personal narration and a touch of absurdity. The sense of isolation and fragmentation that can emanate from the works is nonetheless often counterbalanced with whimsicality and humor.

In her series Gowanus Dance, Marilia Destot isolates and places her model in a cinematic or sequence form, her photographic work focusing on the intimate writing of time and space intermingled. Exploring the same medium, Simon Courchel creates in each of his photographs an urban choreography or performance thus referencing his background as a dancer; the figure being always insulated and centered within the frame. In Anne Mourier’s small sculptures depicting domestic scenes, the figure is removed all together but constantly in mind, like a ghostly presence, only the habitat remains. Nicolas Touron’s ceramic and video installation Artificial Landscape is a visual fable, existing as a landscape of absurdity in which a dead cicada found at the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens during his numerous explorations there, plays the main character.

Jeanne Verdoux’s prints show the human figure deprived from any context but in constant motion, sometimes in the verge of falling, where ground and air merge into one dimension. Fanny Allié’s characters, often placed on a white background are also removed from their habitat or environment; their urban feel come through nonetheless. In his Artforum mashup series, Julien Gardair combines and cuts Artforum advertisement pages, revealing from these art magazines human silhouettes intermingling with animals, body and abstract elements and creating a chaotic mass. Lastly, in order to remedy the isolation she may find in fast-paced cities, Shani Ha creates versatile sculptures and devices in an effort to bring people together or to add a comforting touch to her surrounding.

 

Neither Here Nor There

The Gallery is closed for winter break and will reopen March 31st for the upcoming show My Country Tis of Thy People, You’re Dying.

Duration of the show: Nov 18, 2016 – Feb 3, 2017

Opening reception: Nov 18th, 2016

Featuring works by: Anne Mourier, Fanny Allié, Jeanne verdoux, Julien Gardair, Marilia Destot, Nicolas Touron, Shani Ha, Simon Courchel

Curated by: Nicolas Touron / Fanny Allié

The exhibition Neither Here Nor There presents the works of eight artists who all share the same birthplace – France and who voluntarily migrated several years ago to New York City.

Not quite from one side or the other anymore, a nonnative constantly oscillates between two realities, fully belonging to none. Through mixed media, sculpture, photography and painting, the artists of Neither Here Nor There examine this state of being slightly “out of tune” and how their experience may have impacted their work over the years.

The exhibit also aims to highlight a common thread between all the works – a feeling of detachment of the human figure from its urban environment, within a context of personal narration and a touch of absurdity. The sense of isolation and fragmentation that can emanate from the works is nonetheless often counterbalanced with whimsicality and humor.

In her series Gowanus Dance, Marilia Destot isolates and places her model in a cinematic or sequence form, her photographic work focusing on the intimate writing of time and space intercrossed. Exploring the same medium, Simon Courchel creates in each of his photographs an urban choreography or performance thus referencing his background as a dancer; the figure being always insulated and centered within the frame. In Anne Mourier’s small sculptures depicting domestic scenes, the figure is removed all together but constantly in mind, like a ghostly presence, only the habitat remains. Nicolas Touron’s ceramic and video installation Artificial Landscape is a visual fable, existing as a landscape of absurdity in which a dead cicada found at the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens during his numerous explorations there, plays the main character. Jeanne Verdoux’s prints show the human figure deprived from any context but in constant motion, sometimes in the verge of falling, where ground and air merge into one dimension. Fanny Allié’s characters, often placed on a white background are also removed from their habitat or environment; their urban feel come through nonetheless.

In his Artforum mashup series, Julien Gardair combines and cuts Artforum advertisement pages, revealing from these art magazines human silhouettes intermingling with animals, body and abstract elements and creating a chaotic mass.

Lastly, in order to remedy the isolation she may find in fast-paced cities, Shani Ha creates versatile sculptures and devices in an effort to bring people together or to add a comforting touch to her surrounding.

PRESS RELEASE

ARTWORK:

OPENING RECEPTION:

BRUNCH:

The Descent of Dust

Special Event by Michael Clemow

Sound Installation using found noise, Yamaha keyboard, and speakers

October 28, 2016 6:30—8:30PM

The Descent of Dust takes its sonic palette from the sounds of a circuit bent and “broken” Yamaha VSS-30 digital synthesizer from 1987. The instrument and a library of sounds recorded from the device are used to create a dirty, textural soundscape in four channels. Driving the composition is a genetic algorithm that creates “cultures” of sonic entities that are born and ultimately eradicated multiple times during the course of the performance.

The VSS-30 is a sampling keyboard, allowing a re-sampling of the generated material. This creates a feedback loop that perpetuates sonic characteristics of one “generation” to the next. The performer can choose to restart the culture during the performance, however, the unstable algorithm will eventually destroy itself, ending the performance.

In line with Radiator Gallery’s group exhibition Works: Reflections on Failure, Michael Clemow’s immersive sound installation The Descent of Dust delves into the essence of failure, questioning the unpredictability of the machine facing mankind’s scrutinizing nature.

Throughout his multi-media sound installation, Clemow will challenge auto-recordings, tracing their ephemeral beings and susceptibility for destruction. Works: Reflections on Failure, curated by Osman Can Yerebakan, features works by Daniel A. Bruce, Esmeralda Kosmatopoulos, Ahmet Civelek, Jennifer Grimyser, Tim Etchells, Dana Stirling, Juliette Dumas, Shannon Finnegan, Kay Rosen, Christina Massey, and George Spencer.

 

Works: Reflections on Failure

September 16-November 12, 2016

Opening reception on September 16th, 2016 between 6:00-9:00PM.

Curated by Osman Can Yerebakan

 

Radiator Gallery is pleased to present Works: Reflections on Failure, a group exhibition

featuring works by Daniel A. Bruce, Esmeralda Kosmatopoulos, Ahmet Civelek, Jennifer

Grimyser, Tim Etchells, Dana Stirling, Juliette Dumas, Shannon Finnegan, Kay Rosen, Christina

Massey and George Spencer. Curated by Osman Can Yerebakan, the exhibition brings together

eleven contemporary artists working in a wide variety of mediums, investigating the notion of

failure in contemporary art.

 

Offering a platform to survey the relationship between the artist, the artwork and the audience;

failure suggests a study on the artistic drive, contextual meaning, and viewer expectation. Inspired

by the late artist and author Édouard Levé’s book Works, in which he gathered more than five-

hundred artistic ideas he aimed to bring into fruition, the exhibition scrutinizes the ambiguous

border separating success from downfall. Levé’s candid devotion for creativity—leading to such

accumulation of ideas that eventually failed to be executed—projects an inquisitive mind’s strive

for achievement, as well as his bold undertaking of potential failures. The exhibition not only

studies the assumption of defeat as creative means, but also juxtaposes its various depictions in

contemporary art. Approaching the topic from various angles, artworks on view respond to

unsuccessfulness through different channels, among which are viewer expectation, emotional

investment, and risk-taking.

 

The exhibition will remain on view through November 12, 2016. Radiator Gallery is located on

10-61 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City, NY 11106. The gallery hours are Friday and Sunday 1-

6 PM or anytime by appointment.

PRESS RELEASE

CHECKLIST

 

ARTWORK:

 

OPENING RECEPTION: